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MIRIN and CUISINE SAKE

Mirin and cooking sake are two rice alcohols often combined because they are complementary and allow you to achieve a very pleasant balance in dishes. Mirin tenderizes meats and fish and prevents them from decomposing during cooking. As for cooking sake, it enhances the flavors of sauces, stews, seasonings and marinades. It also helps reduce frying odors. These two rice wines have slightly different characteristics. Cooking sake is more alcoholic and salty than mirin, which is milder and sweeter. Often combined in Japanese recipes, they complement each other very well and their softness and sweetness allow them to achieve a very pleasant balance with the soy sauce.

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