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- 01 42 61 60 83 - 40 RUE DU LOUVRE, PARIS 1 ER - 7j/7

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DASHI

Dashi broth is used in many dishes, including miso soup and sauces that accompany meats, vegetables and fish. This is the secret of Japanese cuisine, the element that brings umami and depth to dishes. It is made from dried kombu seaweed and katsuobushi, dried bonito shavings. Discover our selection of dashi broths in powder form, to infuse or in broth, and all the ingredients needed to make it yourself!

FAQ

Dashi is a fundamental element of Japanese cuisine, playing a role similar to that of a basic broth in many preparations. It is used to infuse subtle umami and deep flavor into many dishes. Here are some of the most common uses of dashi in Japanese cuisine:

Miso soup: Dashi is the base of miso soup, one of the most emblematic dishes in Japanese cuisine. It is mixed with miso paste to create a hot soup, rich in flavor and umami.

Broths : Dashi is used to make a variety of broths, such as noodle broth (for ramen and udon), Japanese stew broth (sukiyaki), and broth for shabu-shabu.

Sauces: Dashi can be reduced to create sauces, such as teriyaki sauce and tempura sauce, which add flavor and depth to many dishes.

Steaming: Dashi can be used as a cooking liquid for steaming fish, vegetables and other ingredients, infusing foods with umami.

Marinades: It can be incorporated into marinades to enhance the flavor of meats, tofu and other ingredients.

Sushi sauce: In some cases, dashi is used to prepare a mild sauce to accompany sushi, particularly unagi sushi (grilled eel).

Hot dishes: It can be added to hot dishes, such as stews and Japanese curries, to enrich the flavor of the dish.

Japanese salads: Dashi is used to season salads such as sunomono, a vinegared cucumber salad, and Japanese cabbage salad (kyabetsu salad).

Dashi is made from a few basic ingredients, including water, kombu seaweed and dried bonito flakes (katsuobushi). The combination of these elements creates a subtly flavorful liquid that adds depth to many dishes without overpowering other flavors. The choice of quality ingredients used to prepare dashi plays an essential role in the overall quality of Japanese cuisine.

Dashi is an essential staple broth in Japanese cuisine, and is used as a basic ingredient in many dishes. Here are the basic ingredients for making traditional Japanese dashi:

Kombu (seaweed): This is dried seaweed, generally of the konbu variety. It is rich in glutamate, which contributes to the umami of the dashi. You'll need one or more kombu leaves to prepare your dashi.

Katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes): Katsuobushi is made from dried bonito, which is then fermented and smoked. It is generally sold in the form of thin, light scales or flakes. Katsuobushi adds a distinct umami flavor to dashi.

Cold water: Water is the main ingredient for creating dashi broth.

Optionally, you can also add certain other ingredients to customize the taste of the dashi to suit your preferences. For example:

Dried shiitake: Dried shiitake mushrooms can be added to enhance the umami flavor of the dashi, especially if you're preparing a vegan or vegetarian version.

Niboshi (dried sardines): Niboshi, or small dried sardines, can also be used to prepare a dashi with a richer, deeper flavor.

Mirin (sweet cooking wine) and soy sauce: These ingredients can be added to give the dashi a touch of sweetness and saltiness, especially if you're preparing it for miso soup.

Here are the basic steps for preparing dashi:

Gently wipe the kombu with a clean cloth to remove dirt, but don't wash it.

Place the kombu in cold water and leave to soak for about 30 minutes at room temperature. Do not let the water boil.

Heat the water slowly with the kombu, removing the kombu just before it begins to boil (about 80°C or 176°F).

Add the katsuobushi to the hot water, turn off the heat and leave to infuse for a few minutes.

Strain the liquid through a fine sieve to remove the pieces of kombu and katsuobushi.

Dashi is now ready to be used as a base for soups, broths, sauces and many other Japanese dishes.

Dashi is a staple broth in Japanese cuisine, and there are several recipes for making it, depending on the ingredients you use and the dish you want to prepare. Here are some of the most common dashi recipes:

Basic Dashi (Ichiban Dashi):

Ingredients: Kombu (seaweed), katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes), water.

Preparation: Soak kombu in cold water for about 30 minutes. Heat the water with the kombu to around 80°C (176°F) without boiling. Remove the kombu, add the dried bonito flakes and leave to infuse for a few minutes. Strain the liquid to obtain the dashi.

Kombu Dashi Seul (Kombu Dashi):

Ingredients: Kombu, water.

Preparation: Soak kombu in cold water for several hours, preferably overnight. Heat the water with the kombu to around 80°C (176°F) without boiling. Remove the kombu and strain the liquid.

Vegetarian Dashi (Shojin Dashi):

Ingredients: Kombu, dried shiitake, water.

Preparation: Soak kombu and dried shiitake in cold water for several hours. Heat the water with the ingredients to around 80°C (176°F) without boiling. Remove the ingredients and strain the liquid. This dashi is used in vegetarian Buddhist cooking.

Sardine Dashi (Niboshi Dashi):

Ingredients: Niboshi (small dried sardines), kombu, water.

Preparation: Soak kombu and niboshi in cold water for several hours. Heat the water with the ingredients to around 80°C (176°F) without boiling. Remove the ingredients and strain the liquid. This dashi has a more intense flavor and is commonly used for more robust dishes.

Vegetable Dashi (Yasai Dashi):

Ingredients: Various vegetables (e.g. mushrooms, carrots, onions), water.

Preparation: Boil vegetables in water to create a vegetable broth.

The choice of dashi recipe depends on the dish you're preparing and your taste preferences. Basic dashi is versatile and suitable for many preparations, while variants bring different flavors to specific dishes.

Dashi is closely linked to umami, as it is one of the main sources of this fifth fundamental flavor in Japanese cuisine. Here's how dashi is intrinsically linked to umami:

Umami ingredients: The basic ingredients of dashi, particularly kombu (seaweed) and katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes), are naturally rich in glutamic acid, an amino acid that is the main contributor to umami flavor. When these ingredients are infused in water to create dashi broth, they release this glutamic acid, creating an umami flavor base for many dishes.

Umami booster: Dashi often acts as an umami booster in many dishes. Umami enhances other flavors, whether sweet, salty, sour or bitter. As a result, dashi is often used to enhance the overall flavor of a dish, giving it a deeper, richer quality.

Umami versatility: Dashi is used in a wide range of Japanese culinary preparations, from miso soup to soy sauces and broths for noodles. This versatility means that dashi's umami can be incorporated into a wide variety of dishes, providing a complex, balanced flavor.

Natural umami: The umami in dashi is natural, meaning that it comes from authentic food ingredients rather than chemical additives. This contributes to the taste quality of dishes prepared with dashi.

In short, dashi is a key element in Japanese cuisine because of its role as a natural source and enhancer of umami. It adds an essential gustatory dimension to traditional Japanese dishes and is a fundamental component of the flavor palette of this refined cuisine.

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