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ALGAE

Japan is a country focused on the sea, and it shows on the plate! Along with fish, seaweed is at the heart of Japanese cuisine and brings great richness to dishes thanks to the many edible varieties that exist. They are most often found dried or roasted, in the form of leaves or strips. In addition to being very tasty, they are rich in antioxidants, vitamins and iodine and they promote cardiovascular health.

FAQ
HOW TO STORE SEAWEED

Seaweed preservation depends on the type of seaweed and its form (fresh, dried or canned). Here are a few ways to store seaweed:

If you have fresh seaweed, keep it refrigerated. It's best to use them within two days of purchase. Before storing, rinse with clean water to remove any salt or impurities. Wrap in a damp paper towel or place in a perforated plastic bag to prevent drying out.

For dried seaweeds such as nori, kombu, wakame, arame, etc., we recommend keeping them in their original packaging or transferring them to an airtight container. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Dried seaweed can be kept for several months, or even over a year, if stored correctly.

Dried seaweed can absorb moisture from the air, which can reduce its quality and shelf life. It is therefore preferable to store them in airtight containers.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF SEAWEED?

Agar-agar: made from the walls of red seaweed, processed into powder or long rectangular pieces. Agar-agar has no taste or smell, and is used to naturally gel preparations, particularly sweet ones. Perfect for vegetarians and vegans who do not consume animal gelatin but still wish to make or enjoy creams, custards, mousses... Agar-agar is also said to help the body eliminate toxins.

Aramé: this brown seaweed is often eaten after being soaked and rehydrated. It is used in salads, soups and stir-fries. Aramé is rich in fiber, calcium, magnesium and iron.

Hijiki: this small black seaweed is often cooked and seasoned before use. It is often mixed with other ingredients such as vegetables, tofu or mushrooms. Hijiki seaweed is rich in fiber, calcium, iron and minerals.

Kombu: mainly used in dashi broth, kombu seaweed has a mild, sweet flavor that adds umami to preparations. It can also be enjoyed finely sliced in a cucumber salad, candied in sweet soy sauce or in place of the nori seaweed that surrounds maki.

Nori: used in particular for wrapping maki, nori seaweed can also be eaten seasoned or as a condiment for rice (known as furikake, a mixture of sesame seeds, katsuobushi, green seaweed flakes and nori seaweed).

Wakame: this slightly gelatinous seaweed is mainly eaten in miso soup and cold in salads, either on its own or with raw vegetables. It's an excellent source of fiber and protein.

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