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OILS and VINEGARS

In Japanese cuisine, it's all about balance! The Japanese use a wide variety of oils, each of which brings a different flavor, texture and aroma to dishes. Vinegars are very appreciated for their acidity and freshness which counterbalance fried foods and rich dishes. Discover our selection of oils and vinegars to accompany you on a daily basis.

FAQ
WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT OILS USED IN JAPANESE CUISINE?

Here are some of the most common Japanese oils:

Sesame oil: very popular in Japan, it is appreciated for its distinct aromas and lightly roasted hazelnut flavor. It is used in marinades, vinaigrettes, stir-fries and noodle dishes.

Rice bran oil: extracted from rice bran, it is very rich in antioxidants, fiber and vitamin E. It is ideal for frying, as it has a low odor and adds an unrivaled crispness and lightness. It's also perfect for vinaigrettes or mayonnaise, as a change from your usual oil.

Soybean oil: often used for cooking, stir-frying and frying, thanks to its light flavor.

Toasted sesame oil: made from toasted sesame seeds, its flavor is more pronounced and richer than conventional sesame oil. It adds a touch of sesame flavor to dishes such as noodles, rice and stir-fries.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF VINEGAR USED IN JAPANESE CUISINE?

Japan offers a variety of unique vinegars that are used to add acidity, flavor and balance to rich dishes. Here are some of the most commonly used Japanese vinegars:

Rice vinegar: komesu in Japanese, this is a staple ingredient of Japanese cuisine. Made from fermented rice, it has a mild, delicate flavor. It is used in the preparation of sushi rice, marinades, vinaigrettes and sauces to add a slight acidity and counteract the greasiness of certain dishes.

Black rice vinegar: called kurozu, it is made from fermented brown rice. It has a richer, more pronounced flavor than ordinary rice vinegar. It's perfect for deglazing meat, spicing up broth, legume salads and sweet-and-sour sauces.

Plum vinegar:umeboshi su is made from plums marinated in rice vinegar. Its sweet-and-sour and salty flavors are appreciated in salad dressings, pickled vegetables and rice dishes.

Sake vinegar: or sakezu, is a type of Japanese vinegar made from sake, the traditional rice alcohol. Its flavor is sweet and subtly acidic. It is often used in Japanese cuisine to bring balanced acidity and subtle flavor to dishes. It is also used to marinate and tenderize meat, fish and vegetables. In vinaigrettes, it goes well with other ingredients such as sesame oil, soy sauce, ginger or honey.

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