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JAPANESE NOODLES

If Japan is the country of rice, there is more than just sushi in life and noodles occupy a special place in the daily life of the Japanese . It is said that there are as many recipes as there are villages. Their price and ease of preparation and adaptation explain their great popularity. The majority are wheat-based, but there are also buckwheat, seaweed and vegetable-based ones. Taste them all to find your favorite!

FAQ
WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT JAPANESE NOODLES?

Ramen: born in China, these wheat noodles are usually eaten in a miso or soy sauce-based broth of the same name. Their instant version is very popular in Japan, but they can also be found fresh, and even fried for a crunchy snack!

Soba: these buckwheat noodles (soba in Japanese) are sometimes mixed with wheat flour (so be sure to check the composition if you're gluten intolerant). They can be cooked very simply: hot in soup or cold, seasoned with tsuyu sauce.

Yakisoba: despite their name, these noodles have nothing in common with soba. Yakisoba are wheat noodles originating from China, and are usually sautéed with vegetables, chicken and sesame, cooked on teppanyaki, the Japanese griddle.

Udon: these thick, white, chewy wheat noodles can be enjoyed in a variety of ways: hot or cold, soaked in broth or stir-fried! Their composition is very simple: wheat flour, water and salt. They're a Japanese favorite, alongside soba and ramen.

Somen: thin, long and white, somen are best eaten cold in summer. Little known outside Japan, they are quick and easy to prepare.

Shirataki: these noodles are made from konjac flour, the tuber of an Asian lily plant. Gluten-free and very low in calories, they are also satiating - a small quantity is enough. Their neutral taste means they can be combined with a wide range of sauces.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NOODLES AND PASTA?

Composition: pasta is generally made from durum wheat flour or semolina, mixed with water and sometimes eggs. Noodles, on the other hand, are made from soft wheat flour or rice flour, mixed with water and sometimes eggs.

Their origins: pasta is often associated with Italian cuisine, where it plays an important role in many traditional dishes. Noodles are widely used in Asian cuisine, particularly in countries such as China, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Each culture has its own methods of preparing and eating noodles, resulting in a wide variety of dishes.

Texture and flavor: Italian pasta tends to have a firmer, more elastic texture when cooked al dente. Their neutral taste blends well with the sauces and ingredients with which they are combined. The texture of Asian noodles, on the other hand, varies greatly from one type to another. Asian noodles also have a more pronounced flavor.

Method of preparation: Italian pasta is generally cooked in boiling salted water until al dente, then drained before being mixed with sauces. Asian noodles are also boiled, but are often rinsed in cold water after cooking to remove the starch and stop the cooking process. They cook in just a few minutes.

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