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ALCOHOLS - Shochu & awamori

Discover the art of Japanese distillation with our range of shochu and awamori. Made from various ingredients, such as sweet potato, barley or rice, these spirits offer a unique taste experience. They can be enjoyed neat, with water or incorporated into creative cocktails.

FAQ

Shochu and awamori are two types of Japanese spirits that share certain similarities, but also present distinct differences in terms of production methods and organoleptic characteristics. Originating in Kyushu's Kagoshima prefecture, these spirits benefit from traditional production and a distinct fermentation process. Their fermentation process with the addition of koji, a special mold used to convert starch into sugar, gives these drinks their unique character.

Shochu is a Japanese spirit generally distilled from barley, sweet potatoes (such as satsuma-imo), short-grain rice, wheat, sesame, buckwheat or sugar cane. Shochu is distilled differently from whisky or sake. It is distilled at a lower temperature, which preserves more of its subtle flavours. It is a beautiful white, or sometimes very slightly amber, beverage.

Shochu generally has an alcohol content of around 25% to 30%, although this can vary according to the ingredients used.

The organoleptic characteristics of shochu vary according to the base ingredient. Flavors range from sweet and fruity to dry and spicy. Some shochu have subtle nutty, fruity or herbal notes. Shochu is generally less powerful in flavor than other spirits. Shochu is produced throughout Japan, but is particularly associated with the Kyushu region. Kagoshima, located in Kyushu, is famous for its quality shochu production. The prefecture is home to many renowned distilleries.

This spirit, originally from the island of Okinawa in Japan, is sometimes called "honkaku shochu", meaning "authentic shochu". It is made from rice (indigenous to Okinawa), which is a long grain rice, special yeast and local spring water. It undergoes double fermentation, first in an open vat and then in the bottle, giving it a unique taste and beautiful aroma. It is a traditionally distilled beverage with a high alcohol content, generally between 30% and 43%, although stronger versions are also available.

Awamori is characterized by unique aromas and flavors, often described as full-bodied and complex. It can have notes of flowers in quantity, herbs, tropical fruits and nuts. Its flavor is influenced by the length of aging, the casks used and other factors. It is a spirit specific to the island of Okinawa, where it is deeply rooted in local culture.

Storage and ageing are essential to develop the aroma and flavour of both drinks. Oak casks are sometimes used to obtain flavors similar to those of wine or sake. These beverages are not just enjoyed. They are also used in Japanese cuisine to prepare richly flavored sauces and marinades.

Both spirits are available in a variety of packaging, including small bowls traditional to Japan. Their popularity continues to grow outside their home region, so you can now discover these unique beverages wherever you are!

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